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    Enacted on June 30, 2022, California’s 2022-23 budget addresses longstanding system challenges related to health care, long-term services and supports, workforce, and housing for older adults, people with disabilities, and their caregivers. It includes a $17 billion broad-based relief package and continued investment in implementing the Master Plan for Aging. 
    California ranked ninth overall on the 2020 LTSS State Scorecard, maintaining the same rank from 2017. This brief provides an overview of California’s Scorecard performance and key recommendations for transforming its LTSS system to better serve older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
    On June 29, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed California’s 2020-21 budget. The budget addresses the $54.3 billion deficit while maintaining funding for critical programs serving older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
    On May 14, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2020-21 proposed budget. The revision includes cuts to and elimination of critical home- and community-based services that impact the state’s most vulnerable older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
    Whether you’re over the age of 65 or have a loved one who is, there are simple, inexpensive things you can do TODAY to help plan for aging with dignity, choice, and independence. Access this checklist and share with others who might need it.
    Having regular conversations with your doctor is an important component of aging with dignity and independence. This guide describes important conversations to have with your doctor to prepare for changing health needs as you grow older.
    Someone turning age 65 today has almost a 70 percent chance of needing some type of long-term care (LTC) in their remaining years. Woman need care longer (3.7 years) than men (2.2 years) and while one-third of today's 65-year-olds may never need LTC, 20 percent (1 in 5) will need it for longer than five years. To better prepare, here are 10 things to know if you are providing help to an older loved one.