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coordinated care


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One in three people in America ages 18-39 provides unpaid care to an adult friend or relative. Another third of millennials believe they will provide this kind of support in the next five years. To help prepare, here are 10 things millennials should know.
Read the Foundation’s top 10 recommendations for improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid, also known as dually eligible individuals.
California maintained its rank at No. 9, but it must do more to keep up with the growth of the older adult population. This brief highlights trends in California’s performance and opportunities to improve its rate of progress.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses California's 2017-2018 proposed budget and how scaling back on key components of the Coordinated Care Initiative diminishes the state's progress toward integrated care for high-need, high-cost older adults.
Coordinated care makes a difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings, and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Karen's case study.
Coordinated care makes a difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings, and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Zena's case study.
Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities. Read Gabriela's case study.
Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities. Read Josephine's case study.
Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Chito's case study.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof explains what recent polling results and coordinated care stories tell us about the experiences of Medicare-Medicaid individuals, and identifies opportunities to further strengthen and expand support.
California is among a dozen states participating in the national demonstration to improve care for people with serious chronic illnesses and functional limitations who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare. We commissioned the Field Research Corporation to poll the state's dual eligibles, including people enrolled and those opting out in five demonstration counties as well as people in non-demonstration counties. Find out more in this week's Perspectives.
A white paper and series of briefs from Avalere Health produced with support from The SCAN Foundation explore the use of non-medical data to better coordinate care for high risk Medicare beneficiaries, which can lead to improvements in care while providing health plans a return on investment.
Following on previous reports describing the population who uses Medi-Cal-funded long-term services and supports, the California Medicaid Research Institute has produced a report that describes key characteristics of the population using LTSS across each of the state’s 58 counties. This report describes spending and service use patterns across the 58 counties.
The California Medicaid Research Institute (CAMRI) developed an integrated and longitudinal database containing Medi-Cal and Medicare claims and assessment data of LTSS recipients in California in 2008. CAMRI's integrated database provides a unique opportunity to look at characteristics and program spending across the entire care continuum for beneficiaries with LTSS needs within Medi-Cal and for dual eligibles across Medicare and Medi-Cal. This report focuses on LTSS use and spending in the eight duals demonstration counties.
This is the third report coming from the California Medicaid Research Institute (CAMRI) project entitled: Comprehensive Analysis of Home- and Community-Based Services in California. The report describes Medicare and Medi-Cal spending for those beneficiaries using long-term services and supports funded by Medi-Cal.
In 2012, there was a dearth of information on how best to build partnerships between community-based organizations and health care systems. This brief, authored by Victor Tabbush, was developed to help readers better understand specific opportunities for these partnerships in California.
The California Medicaid Research Institute (CAMRI) compiled a report that identifies Californians who receive home-and community-based support and what services they receive. The brief brings together available information spread across multiple state and federal data systems.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reflects on the Foundation's presence at the 2012 American Society on Aging Conference and how improving long-term care in California will require the long-term strategies and dedication of a social movement.
In this brief, the California Medicaid Research Institute documents its process to acquire and link all the data sources necessary to evaluate long-term care services utilization, costs, and outcomes in California. This provides useful information about how data currently flows in the state and how system transformation can be supported.
High quality, cost effective health care delivery is all about targeting – the right care, by the right provider, at the right time, in the right place, and for the right cost. It sounds straightforward, almost easy. The challenge to getting it right is understanding the range of variables in a person’s life that drive health care use and costs. Find out more in this week's Perspectives.