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Publications

    Developed with funding from The SCAN Foundation, RockHealth.org released “A Lens on Health Equity in Digital Health: Unlocking the Innovation Opportunity” in April 2024. This report synthesizes perspectives from industry leaders, identifying strategic avenues to
    Financial security is fundamental to older adults’ choices in where and how they age. Yet many older adults are not financially secure – lacking retirement savings, emergency savings, and the financial management tools they need.

    On January 10, 2023, Governor Gavin Newsom released California’s 2023-24 proposed budget. The proposal includes program changes that impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.

    Enacted on June 30, 2022, California’s 2022-23 budget addresses longstanding system challenges related to health care, long-term services and supports, workforce, and housing for older adults, people with disabilities, and their caregivers. It includes a $17 billion broad-based relief package and continued investment in implementing the Master Plan for Aging. 
    In this February 2022 Perspectives, Dr. Mohanty answers several questions regarding The SCAN Foundation’s aims and progress during during her first year of leadership.
    On January 10, 2022, Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2022-23 proposed budget. The proposal includes several program changes that impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.
    At the final week of our 2021 Forum, Amplifying All Voices in Aging, we were joined by founder of RENT Poet/Poet Laureate Brian Sonia-Wallace. Complementing our focus on technical aspects of the work we do to transform care for older adults, Mr. Sonia-Wallace authored a poem in real time to bring us back to the heart of the matter: What do we mean by “aging well” and “aging equitably”? Read the poem and learn more about RENT Poet.
    This brief, updated from August 2020, highlights states that have a Master Plan for Aging, provides examples of key elements of those plans, and discusses how states without a Master Plan can get started. A Master Plan for Aging is a blueprint that: a) includes planning for 10 or more years; b) is often led by a governor with other executive and legislative leaders; and c) is developed to guide the restructuring of state and local policy, programs, and funding toward aging well in the community.
    Enacted on July 12, 2021, California’s 2021-22 budget addresses longstanding system challenges related to health care, long-term services and supports, workforce, and housing for older adults, people with disabilities, and their caregivers. It reflects the recommendations of the governor’s Master Plan for Aging issued earlier in 2021, and includes $4.6 billion to enhance access to home- and community-based services (HCBS), as outlined in California’s proposed HCBS Spending Plan.
    On May 14, 2021, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2021-22 proposed budget. The revision includes a $75.7 billion surplus with investments in economic recovery related to COVID-19 and resources to implement the Master Plan for Aging.
    In this infographic, learn what voters are saying about the Master Plan for Aging and the need to prioritize and invest in our aging population.  
    On January 8, 2021, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2021-22 proposed budget. The proposal includes program changes that impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.
    On January 6, 2021, California Governor Gavin Newsom released a Master Plan for Aging (Master Plan) that establishes a vision for California for All Ages by 2030. This policy brief provides an overview of the Master Plan.
    California ranked ninth overall on the 2020 LTSS State Scorecard, maintaining the same rank from 2017. This brief provides an overview of California’s Scorecard performance and key recommendations for transforming its LTSS system to better serve older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
    On June 29, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed California’s 2020-21 budget. The budget addresses the $54.3 billion deficit while maintaining funding for critical programs serving older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
    This policy brief takes a closer look at how California has implemented federal flexibilities to ensure the state’s long-term services and supports (LTSS) system is responsive to the needs of older adults and people with disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    For a provider group that treats individuals through a mix of risk arrangements, one might reasonably inquire: What is the tipping point when it becomes financially advantageous to offer person-centered care to the entirety of its high-need, high-cost population? This report by Victor Tabbush, based on research conducted with provider groups in California, seeks to answer this question and provide insights.
    On May 14, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2020-21 proposed budget. The revision includes cuts to and elimination of critical home- and community-based services that impact the state’s most vulnerable older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
    On January 10, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2020-21 proposed budget. The proposal includes program changes that specifically impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.

    Californians with Medicare and Medi-Cal have many choices to get the health coverage they need, but choices vary by county. This brief outlines available choices across the state and describes the My Care, My Choice web resource.

    On June 27, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed California’s 2019-20 budget. The budget reflects new program investments for older adults and people with disabilities, including staff resources for the state’s Master Plan for Aging.
    On June 10, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N-14-19, calling for a California Master Plan for Aging. This brief provides a high-level overview of the Executive Order.
    The Master Plan for Aging provides a historic opportunity to design a system that best meets the needs of older Californians of today and tomorrow. This brief describes how the state can better organize resources to meet population needs through focused, coordinated leadership and system-wide planning.
    On May 9, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2019-20 budget. The revision includes modest program changes that impact services for older adults and people with disabilities, including staff resources for the state’s Master Plan for Aging.
    The Blueprint for Health Plans (Executive Summary) highlights successful partnerships for delivering social services and helps identify future opportunities.
    The integration of community-based organizations (CBOs) into health plan networks, on both a formal and informal basis, can help meet the needs of older adults with complex medical and social needs. The Blueprint for Health Plans (Full Report) highlights successful partnerships for delivering social services and helps identify future opportunities.
    More than 80 percent of California voters expect a clear vision and long-term investment plan for our state’s older adults. In this infographic, learn about California's changing demographics, which states are leading the way, and what comprises plan elements.
    On January 10, 2019, Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2019-20 proposed budget. Learn which modest program changes would impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.
    Drawing from four years of Cal MediConnect evaluation results, this brief highlights recommendations for policymakers and health plans to consider in improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid.
    Today, health plans have flexible benefit tools in the Medicare Advantage program. With data analysis by Anne Tumlinson Innovations, this slide deck discusses how health plans can deploy these tools and adopt innovations to serve a rapidly growing group of members age 75 and older.
    In this open letter, Dr. Chernof commends Governor-elect Gavin Newsom on his commitment to develop "a master plan for aging with dignity" in California. Dr. Chernof lists key areas that a master plan must address, such as incorporating strategies for older adults to live and age in the place they call home and providing pathways for older Californians to access affordable health care.
    One in three people in America ages 18-39 provides unpaid care to an adult friend or relative. Another third of millennials believe they will provide this kind of support in the next five years. To help prepare, here are 10 things millennials should know.
    On June 27, 2018, Governor Brown signed California’s 2018-2019 budget. In this fact sheet, read a summary of budget items impacting older adults and people with disabilities.
    On May 11, 2018, California Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. released the May Revision of the 2018-2019 budget. While it includes a significant increase in revenues and modest program investments for older adults and people with disabilities, the state still has no overarching master strategy to meet the needs of an aging California. Read more in this fact sheet.
    This policy brief highlights 10 questions health plans and systems nationwide could consider using in their risk assessments to deliver more cost-effective, quality care.
    The CHRONIC Care Act was passed and signed on February 9, 2018. This policy brief provides a summary of key components of the law.
    On January 10, 2018, California Governor Brown released the proposed 2018-2019 budget. In this fact sheet, learn what modest program changes impacting older adults and people with disabilities were included, and where the budget falls short.
    Read the Foundation’s top 10 recommendations for improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid, also known as dually eligible individuals.
    California maintained its rank at No. 9, but it must do more to keep up with the growth of the older adult population. This brief highlights trends in California’s performance and opportunities to improve its rate of progress.