10 Things You Should Know

Posted June 2, 2013
Aging with dignity and independence is the ability to live life to its fullest in the place you call home, regardless of age, illness, or disability. The largest generation in American history - baby boomers - has begun to turn 65. Twenty years from now this age group will double, reaching nearly 20 percent of the population. The American senior of tomorrow will be better educated, experience lower levels of poverty, live in a more diverse society and have a longer life expectancy   than previous generations.
Posted May 2, 2013
Aging with dignity and independence is the ability to live life to its fullest in the place you call home regardless of age, illness, or disability. While we all like to picture ourselves growing older in a healthy way, the reality is that 70 percent of people over the age of 65 will need help with daily activities at some point in their lives – for an average of three years. This care can touch every aspect of your life – from how you live to where you live – and it can be very costly.
Posted April 2, 2013
Nearly three out of four people over the age of 65 will need some form of help with everyday activities as they get older, from assistance with activities like cooking or transportation to round the clock care. Depending on where you live, there are a variety of services and supports nearby that are designed to help. While each community is unique, there are a few standard resources that can help you know where to turn when the need arises.
Posted March 1, 2013
It is important that your doctor knows as much as possible about your current health situation. This way, if your health needs change over time, you and your doctor can tailor your care to help you live safe and well. The best way to start these conversations is to ask questions. Your doctor has a responsibility to provide you with answers in a way that you can understand. Be sure to write your questions down before your doctor’s visit and take them with you. You may want to invite a loved one to join you at the visit so that s/he can write down the doctor’s answers while...
Posted February 2, 2013
Aging with dignity and independence is the ability to live life to its fullest in the place you call home, regardless of age, illness, or disability. This ideal is important because many Americans have loved ones who are aging, whether it is a spouse, neighbor, parent, or other family member. As a result, those closest to us may soon need some assistance and care in order to continue to live in their communities and among friends and family. A little-known reality is that 70 percent of people over 65 will need long-term care at some point in their lives.
Posted February 1, 2013
The face of American society is changing with people living longer than ever before. Yet right now our nation lacks a system of care and support that enables older adults to age with dignity, independence, and choice in the face of increasing health and daily needs. Vulnerable older adults need more affordable and accessible options for receiving care and support in their homes, so that they don’t have to end up in a nursing home.
Posted January 16, 2013
  Included in this Video Series:  What's Your Plan For Aging? Is Your Doctor Up To Date?  Make Your Home Comfortable And Safe. Where Do You Find Help With Everyday Tasks? Staying Active Makes A Big Difference Who's On Your Team? Knowing When To Ask For Help Is Key 70% Of People Over 65 Need An Average Of Three Years Of Long-Term Care Find Out What Resources Are Available What Can You Do Without Spending A Lot Of Money?
Posted January 16, 2013
Keep a copy of this checklist, track the things you’ve taken care of, and pass it along to others who might also need it.
Posted January 10, 2013
  Video Series: 10 Things You Should Know About Aging with Dignity and Independence
Posted January 9, 2013
  Video Series: 10 Things You Should Know About Aging with Dignity and Independence