Perspectives: What Do You Mean I’m Getting Old? Denial About Aging And Our Impending Long-Term Care Crisis

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It is no secret that Americans are aging, but what is too often lost in this fact is that most people will need help as they grow older. Unfortunately, America does not have a strategy to deal with this growing demand. For some, this help comes in the form of needing just a little bit of assistance in the home with cooking meals or getting groceries. For others, it is more comprehensive daily help in assisted living or nursing home care.

Date Updated: 06/12/2013

As Chair of the newly created federal Commission on Long-Term Care, I believe it is imperative for Americans to understand that 70 percent of us who live beyond the age of 65 will need some form of long-term care, on average for three years. This is a potentially dangerous statistic given the reality that our nation’s system of care is outdated and lacks the tools to meet the needs of our growing senior population.

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