publication

Policy Briefs


Californians with Medicare and Medi-Cal have many choices to get the health coverage they need, but choices vary by county. This brief outlines available choices across the state and describes the My Care, My Choice web resource.
California Governor Newsom called for the development of a Master Plan for Aging, which marks a historic step. The governor stated this plan will serve as a blueprint to prepare California for future demographic changes. In this policy brief, we look at examples from other states and relevant California efforts.
The Master Plan for Aging provides a historic opportunity to design a system that best meets the needs of older Californians of today and tomorrow. This brief describes how the state can better organize resources to meet population needs through focused, coordinated leadership and system-wide planning.
Drawing from four years of Cal MediConnect evaluation results, this brief highlights recommendations for policymakers and health plans to consider in improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid.
This policy brief highlights 10 questions health plans and systems nationwide could consider using in their risk assessments to deliver more cost-effective, quality care.
The CHRONIC Care Act was passed and signed on February 9, 2018. This policy brief provides a summary of key components of the law.
Read the Foundation’s top 10 recommendations for improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid, also known as dually eligible individuals.
California maintained its rank at No. 9, but it must do more to keep up with the growth of the older adult population. This brief highlights trends in California’s performance and opportunities to improve its rate of progress.
This policy brief provides an overview of the various types of quality measures and how they are created, why quality measures matter when caring for adults with complex care needs in integrated systems, and how stakeholders can influence the quality measure development process.
Adults with complex care needs are currently often served by a number of providers and systems that do not talk to each other or coordinate efforts, making it difficult for individuals to receive high-quality care. Efforts to transform delivery systems and associated quality measurements for this vulnerable population are also fragmented. The SCAN Foundation convened a working group to develop consensus on the Essential Attributes of a high-quality system of care that supports system transformation and evaluation. This full report includes the abbreviated literature review of existing frameworks.
This primer document describes the Essential Attributes of this system and the core elements detailing how delivery systems should function to meet the goal, and key definitions of concepts. Collectively, they represent the milestones that, when regularly monitored and measured, can track progress toward the goal.
The number of individuals age 65 and older across the nation is projected to double in the next 50 years, from over 45 million in 2015 to over 95 million in 2065. California's age 65 and older population stands at 4 million, which is projected to double to over 8 million by 2030. This brief offers a basic primer on long-term services and supports (LTSS) in California within a national context. LTSS, also known as long-term care (LTC), provides assistance to people with disabilities of all ages, including older adults who need help with daily activities.
Person-centered care works for older adults with chronic health conditions and daily living needs, but how does it apply to health care organizations?  Is it financially sustainable?  Is there a return on investment?  This issue brief, based on a full report – Person-Centered Care: The Business Case – shows how person-centered care can result in fewer hospitalizations and emergency room visits while increasing one’s quality of life.
Last year, modeling efforts distilled various options to improve America’s financing system for long-term care. This month, three organizations – the Bipartisan Policy Center, LeadingAge, and the Long-Term Care Financing Collaborative – released related policy recommendations. This analysis identifies common themes and notes where the recommendations differ in perspective.
This policy brief summarizes findings from long-term care financing option research by the Urban Institute and Milliman, Inc., courtesy of Health Affairs.
A white paper and series of briefs from Avalere Health produced with support from The SCAN Foundation explore the use of non-medical data to better coordinate care for high risk Medicare beneficiaries, which can lead to improvements in care while providing health plans a return on investment.
This policy brief describes California’s results in the 2014 Long-Term Services and Supports State Scorecard, identifying areas for improvement as well as policy opportunities to transform and improve the state’s system of care.
The findings contained in this report demonstrate the inter-relationship between acute, postacute, and long-term services and support (LTSS) services for Medicare and Medicaid Enrollees (MMEs).
The SCAN Foundation aims to identify models of care that bridge medical care and supportive service systems in an effort to meet people’s needs, values, and preferences. Care coordination is a central component of this vision, which ultimately leads to more person-centered care. This brief outlines The SCAN Foundation’s vision for care coordination in a person-centered, organized system.
This paper was produced as part of California's uniform assessment stakeholders work group by academic partners from the University of Southern California, University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Francisco. It provides information on four selected states' uniform assessment instruments for adults seeking HCBS.
This paper was produced as part of California's uniform assessment stakeholders work group by academic partners from the University of Southern California, University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Francisco. It identifies and compares existing gold-standard recommendations for standardized assessment throughout the U.S.
This paper was produced as part of California's uniform assessment stakeholders work group by academic partners from the University of Southern California, University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Francisco. It describes the current assessment approaches and assessment content for the In-Home Supportive Services program, the Multipurpose Senior Services Program, and Community-Based Adult Services.
This report describes nursing home stays of two of California's most vulnerable populations: those who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medi-Cal and Medi-Cal only beneficiaries. Findings suggest the need for improved coordination between health care and long-term services and supports systems in order to more efficiently and effectively provide services to meet people's needs.
This brief seeks to answer the question of how many employed individuals (who work for large companies, small companies, or are self-employed) do not currently have access to long-term care coverage. This brief also considers the characteristics that make different types of employers strong or weak prospects for long-term care planning options.
This brief series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
This brief series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
Many older adults pay for long-term care out of their income and personal savings until they are poor enough to qualify for Medicaid. In an effort to avoid exhausting their resources and relying on Medicaid, others depend on unpaid family support or go without needed services. Learn more in this policy brief, developed with Avalere.
This paper serves as an overview of the Shaping Affordable Pathways for Aging with Dignity series. The series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
Medicaid provides an important safety net for people who are poor or become poor, either because of the high costs of health and long-term services and supports, or for other reasons. The transition from non-Medicaid to Medicaid status can be difficult, especially since it is often associated with illness, disability, and declining income and assets.
For people who have been independent all of their lives, transitioning to Medicaid means depending on a means-tested welfare program for their health and long-term care services. Moreover, people transitioning to Medicaid are a substantial portion of state Medicaid expenditures. In an effort to avoid exhausting their resources and relying on Medicaid, others depend on unpaid family support or go without needed services.
The long-term care financing series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
This policy brief establishes a basis for the critical system transformation activities necessary to produce a high quality, person-centered system of care for older adults and people with disabilities.
In 2012, there was a dearth of information on how best to build partnerships between community-based organizations and health care systems. This brief, authored by Victor Tabbush, was developed to help readers better understand specific opportunities for these partnerships in California.
This policy brief is the first of two publications from Georgetown University on transforming models of care. The paper affirms that in order to improve care delivery and manage costs, innovations for Medicare beneficiaries who have both chronic conditions and functional impairments should be a top priority.
The SCAN Foundation and the California Department of Health Care Services provided funding to the California Medicaid Research Institute (CaMRI) at the University of California to present analyses of the state’s home- and community-based services (HCBS), titled, "California's Medi-Cal Home & Community Based Services Waivers, Benefits & Eligibility Policies, 2005--2008."
This policy brief examines the “service fulfillment” challenges posed by the CLASS Plan. New and improved mechanisms will be needed for connecting consumers of in-home services and supports with the workers who provide them.
In this policy brief, demographics and key attitudes that differentiate long-term care insurance buyers from those who do not buy are reviewed. This analysis can help the CLASS Plan inform a more cost-effective targeted marketing strategy, reaching out first to those most receptive to the product.
This policy brief looks at best practices in gaining strong participation rates in employer-sponsored, long-term care insurance offerings to help inform strategies for the success of the CLASS Plan.
This policy brief describes lessons learned from the Own Your Future consumer awareness campaign in regard to the best means and messages to encourage long-term care planning and how this information may be useful for communications outreach for the CLASS Plan.
This policy brief describes the benefits and challenges of using debit cards and cash in CLASS and how they could be implemented and integrated into a Financial Management Services structure.