publication

Medicare & Medicaid


Californians with Medicare and Medi-Cal have many choices to get the health coverage they need, but choices vary by county. This brief outlines available choices across the state and describes the My Care, My Choice web resource.
The Blueprint for Health Plans (Executive Summary) highlights successful partnerships for delivering social services and helps identify future opportunities.
The integration of community-based organizations (CBOs) into health plan networks, on both a formal and informal basis, can help meet the needs of older adults with complex medical and social needs. The Blueprint for Health Plans (Full Report) highlights successful partnerships for delivering social services and helps identify future opportunities.
Drawing from four years of Cal MediConnect evaluation results, this brief highlights recommendations for policymakers and health plans to consider in improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid.
Today, health plans have flexible benefit tools in the Medicare Advantage program. With data analysis by Anne Tumlinson Innovations, this slide deck discusses how health plans can deploy these tools and adopt innovations to serve a rapidly growing group of members age 75 and older.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the Foundation's efforts over the past 10 years to better the lives of vulnerable older adults and families. He also reflects on the Foundation's priorities for 2019 and beyond.
For most Americans, higher health care spending has not translated into improved quality, particularly for those with complex medical or social needs. In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the impact of the CHRONIC Care Act as a path to better care for older adults.
This policy brief highlights 10 questions health plans and systems nationwide could consider using in their risk assessments to deliver more cost-effective, quality care.
The CHRONIC Care Act was passed and signed on February 9, 2018. This policy brief provides a summary of key components of the law.
Read the Foundation’s top 10 recommendations for improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid, also known as dually eligible individuals.
Immediately following the 2016 presidential election, Dr. Chernof wrote a letter to then President-elect Trump describing five action items for supporting older Americans.
Last year, modeling efforts distilled various options to improve America’s financing system for long-term care. This month, three organizations – the Bipartisan Policy Center, LeadingAge, and the Long-Term Care Financing Collaborative – released related policy recommendations. This analysis identifies common themes and notes where the recommendations differ in perspective.
Coordinated care makes a difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings, and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Karen's case study.
Coordinated care makes a difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings, and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Zena's case study.
Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities. Read Gabriela's case study.
Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities. Read Josephine's case study.
Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Chito's case study.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof explains what recent polling results and coordinated care stories tell us about the experiences of Medicare-Medicaid individuals, and identifies opportunities to further strengthen and expand support.
This policy brief summarizes findings from long-term care financing option research by the Urban Institute and Milliman, Inc., courtesy of Health Affairs.
Greater costs for older women, who average 2-1/2 years of high-level need.
Half of U.S. reaching 65 will need high levels of costly help with daily activities.
1 in 7 of all older Americans will need a high level of help with everyday activities for 5+ years.
Families pay >50% of costs for high-level needs that older Americans face.
California is among a dozen states participating in the national demonstration to improve care for people with serious chronic illnesses and functional limitations who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare. We commissioned the Field Research Corporation to poll the state's dual eligibles, including people enrolled and those opting out in five demonstration counties as well as people in non-demonstration counties. Find out more in this week's Perspectives.
Read Dr. Chernof's perspectives on the importance of there being effective partnerships between health care entities and community-based organizations.
Read Dr. Bruce Chernof's Perspectives exploring progress on eight areas from the Affordable Care Act to help older Americans get the right care at the right time by the right providers.
A new report and series of briefs from Avalere Health commissioned by The SCAN Foundation explore how gathering and using non-medical data to better coordinate care for high risk Medicare beneficiaries can improve person-centered care and be financially sustainable for health plans.
High quality, cost effective health care delivery is all about targeting – the right care, by the right provider, at the right time, in the right place, and for the right cost. It sounds straightforward, almost easy. The challenge to getting it right is understanding the range of variables in a person’s life that drive health care use and costs. Find out more in this week's Perspectives.
The SCAN Foundation, in partnership with Avalere Health, released a web-based modeling tool that enables policymakers and the public to test the budgetary implications of a wide variety of federally run long-term care insurance programs. The model, called the Long-Term Care Policy Simulator, produces more than 2,500 unique outputs, each illustrating how public long-term care insurance program designs and benefits translate into estimated coverage, participation rates, and costs to participants and taxpayers. Read more in this report.