publication

Person-Centered Care


In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reflects on the recently held 2019 Master Plan for Aging Forum: Designing a System Built Around People and Partnerships, which served as a launch pad for the state’s stakeholder engagement efforts for developing the California Master Plan for Aging.
On June 10, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N-14-19, calling for a California Master Plan for Aging. This brief provides a high-level overview of the Executive Order.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the Administration's plan to develop a California Master Plan for Aging (Master Plan). He frames four elements critical to the Master Plan’s success and asks all of us to reflect on what truly matters to older Californians and their families.
California Governor Newsom called for the development of a Master Plan for Aging, which marks a historic step. The governor stated this plan will serve as a blueprint to prepare California for future demographic changes. In this policy brief, we look at examples from other states and relevant California efforts.
The Master Plan for Aging provides a historic opportunity to design a system that best meets the needs of older Californians of today and tomorrow. This brief describes how the state can better organize resources to meet population needs through focused, coordinated leadership and system-wide planning.
Today, health plans have flexible benefit tools in the Medicare Advantage program. With data analysis by Anne Tumlinson Innovations, this slide deck discusses how health plans can deploy these tools and adopt innovations to serve a rapidly growing group of members age 75 and older.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the Foundation's efforts over the past 10 years to better the lives of vulnerable older adults and families. He also reflects on the Foundation's priorities for 2019 and beyond.
For most Americans, higher health care spending has not translated into improved quality, particularly for those with complex medical or social needs. In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the impact of the CHRONIC Care Act as a path to better care for older adults.
This policy brief highlights 10 questions health plans and systems nationwide could consider using in their risk assessments to deliver more cost-effective, quality care.
The CHRONIC Care Act was passed and signed on February 9, 2018. This policy brief provides a summary of key components of the law.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reviews what's missing from Governor Brown's proposed 2018-2019 budget. It outlined modest adjustments to programs impacting older adults and people with disabilities and focuses on building the financial stability of the state, paying off debt, and strengthening elements of our infrastructure. It fails, however, to outline solutions to the challenges facing California’s older adults and people with disabilities.
Read the Foundation’s top 10 recommendations for improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid, also known as dually eligible individuals.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the need to redefine current health care quality measures, especially from the vantage point of those needing care and not just for those who provide and pay for it. In support of this goal, three new resources are available to help frame measures and advance this work.
This policy brief provides an overview of the various types of quality measures and how they are created, why quality measures matter when caring for adults with complex care needs in integrated systems, and how stakeholders can influence the quality measure development process.
Adults with complex care needs are currently often served by a number of providers and systems that do not talk to each other or coordinate efforts, making it difficult for individuals to receive high-quality care. Efforts to transform delivery systems and associated quality measurements for this vulnerable population are also fragmented. The SCAN Foundation convened a working group to develop consensus on the Essential Attributes of a high-quality system of care that supports system transformation and evaluation. This full report includes the abbreviated literature review of existing frameworks.
This primer document describes the Essential Attributes of this system and the core elements detailing how delivery systems should function to meet the goal, and key definitions of concepts. Collectively, they represent the milestones that, when regularly monitored and measured, can track progress toward the goal.
As Medicare moves away from fee-for-service and utilization-based managed care to value-based purchasing, addressing older adults’ health in light of functional needs is becoming a business necessity. In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof recognizes delivery systems that champion person-centered care as the practical way of the future and introduces two resources to help health systems leaders justify and ramp up greater adoption of person-centered care models.
Person-centered care works for older adults with chronic health conditions and daily living needs, but how does it apply to health care organizations?  Is it financially sustainable?  Is there a return on investment?  This issue brief, based on a full report – Person-Centered Care: The Business Case – shows how person-centered care can result in fewer hospitalizations and emergency room visits while increasing one’s quality of life.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof highlights the similarities across each set of recommendations and advocates for the multi-pronged approach put forth by all groups—one that clarifies personal responsibility, outlines private market solutions, addresses long-term needs, and refocuses Medicaid’s role.
Read Dr. Chernof's perspectives on the importance of there being effective partnerships between health care entities and community-based organizations.
The SCAN Foundation teamed up with Avalere Health to create an informative roadmap outlining best practices of sustainable business models for providing person-centered care to older adults with substantial health needs. Highlighting case studies from both public and private programs, this roadmap will help your organization demonstrate and communicate the value of your care delivery model.
A white paper and series of briefs from Avalere Health produced with support from The SCAN Foundation explore the use of non-medical data to better coordinate care for high risk Medicare beneficiaries, which can lead to improvements in care while providing health plans a return on investment.
A new report and series of briefs from Avalere Health commissioned by The SCAN Foundation explore how gathering and using non-medical data to better coordinate care for high risk Medicare beneficiaries can improve person-centered care and be financially sustainable for health plans.
To succeed in this era of health system transformation, plans and providers bearing risk – in an accountable care organization (ACO) for example – will need strategies for managing a broad array of care needs for high-risk beneficiaries across multiple settings of care. Download this fact sheet to learn more.
In this paper, the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) discusses prior integration efforts; introduces a model for integrated entities and a framework for assessing and promoting quality of integrated care; and explores the challenges to implementing and achieving the goals of person-centered, integrated care for Medicare-Medicaid beneficiaries. They use the word “framework” to describe the key concepts underlying the structure and process measures; it can also be expanded to include the content of performance measures as companions to the structure and process measures.
This policy brief establishes a basis for the critical system transformation activities necessary to produce a high quality, person-centered system of care for older adults and people with disabilities.
High quality, cost effective health care delivery is all about targeting – the right care, by the right provider, at the right time, in the right place, and for the right cost. It sounds straightforward, almost easy. The challenge to getting it right is understanding the range of variables in a person’s life that drive health care use and costs. Find out more in this week's Perspectives.
This policy brief is the first of two publications from Georgetown University on transforming models of care. The paper affirms that in order to improve care delivery and manage costs, innovations for Medicare beneficiaries who have both chronic conditions and functional impairments should be a top priority.