publication

dual eligibles


Tagged in: `dual eligibles`

Californians with Medicare and Medi-Cal have many choices to get the health coverage they need, but choices vary by county. This brief outlines available choices across the state and describes the My Care, My Choice web resource.
Drawing from four years of Cal MediConnect evaluation results, this brief highlights recommendations for policymakers and health plans to consider in improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid.
Read the Foundation’s top 10 recommendations for improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid, also known as dually eligible individuals.
As California’s Medicare-Medicaid demonstration becomes more established, a clearer picture is emerging. Over the last 18 months, Field Research Corporation and the University of California have completed numerous evaluation activities to better understand the experiences of dual eligible individuals (both those who enrolled in Cal MediConnect and those who opted out), health plans, health systems, and community-based providers. In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof examines this rich body of work, identifying successes and what needs to improve as the demonstration moves forward.
Coordinated care makes a difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings, and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Karen's case study.
Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities. Read Gabriela's case study.
Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities. Read Josephine's case study.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof explains what recent polling results and coordinated care stories tell us about the experiences of Medicare-Medicaid individuals, and identifies opportunities to further strengthen and expand support.
California is among a dozen states participating in the national demonstration to improve care for people with serious chronic illnesses and functional limitations who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare. We commissioned the Field Research Corporation to poll the state's dual eligibles, including people enrolled and those opting out in five demonstration counties as well as people in non-demonstration counties. Find out more in this week's Perspectives.
The California Medicaid Research Institute (CAMRI) developed an integrated and longitudinal database containing Medi-Cal and Medicare claims and assessment data of LTSS recipients in California in 2008. CAMRI's integrated database provides a unique opportunity to look at characteristics and program spending across the entire care continuum for beneficiaries with LTSS needs within Medi-Cal and for dual eligibles across Medicare and Medi-Cal. This report focuses on LTSS use and spending in the eight duals demonstration counties.
This is the third report coming from the California Medicaid Research Institute (CAMRI) project entitled: Comprehensive Analysis of Home- and Community-Based Services in California. The report describes Medicare and Medi-Cal spending for those beneficiaries using long-term services and supports funded by Medi-Cal.
The California Medicaid Research Institute (CAMRI) compiled a report that identifies Californians who receive home-and community-based support and what services they receive. The brief brings together available information spread across multiple state and federal data systems.
In this brief, the California Medicaid Research Institute documents its process to acquire and link all the data sources necessary to evaluate long-term care services utilization, costs, and outcomes in California. This provides useful information about how data currently flows in the state and how system transformation can be supported.