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In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reflects on the recently held 2019 Master Plan for Aging Forum: Designing a System Built Around People and Partnerships, which served as a launch pad for the state’s stakeholder engagement efforts for developing the California Master Plan for Aging.
On June 27, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed California’s 2019-20 budget. The budget reflects new program investments for older adults and people with disabilities, including staff resources for the state’s Master Plan for Aging.
On June 10, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N-14-19, calling for a California Master Plan for Aging. This brief provides a high-level overview of the Executive Order.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the Administration's plan to develop a California Master Plan for Aging (Master Plan). He frames four elements critical to the Master Plan’s success and asks all of us to reflect on what truly matters to older Californians and their families.
California Governor Newsom called for the development of a Master Plan for Aging, which marks a historic step. The governor stated this plan will serve as a blueprint to prepare California for future demographic changes. In this policy brief, we look at examples from other states and relevant California efforts.
The Master Plan for Aging provides a historic opportunity to design a system that best meets the needs of older Californians of today and tomorrow. This brief describes how the state can better organize resources to meet population needs through focused, coordinated leadership and system-wide planning.
On May 9, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2019-20 budget. The revision includes modest program changes that impact services for older adults and people with disabilities, including staff resources for the state’s Master Plan for Aging.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reflects on the Master Plan for Aging panel discussion following the February 5 film screening of Lives Well Lived in Sacramento. At the event, local policymakers vocalized that without a strategy to meet the needs of all aging Californians, the state will confront mounting challenges.
More than 80 percent of California voters expect a clear vision and long-term investment plan for our state’s older adults. In this infographic, learn about California's changing demographics, which states are leading the way, and what comprises plan elements.
On January 10, 2019, Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2019-20 proposed budget. Learn which modest program changes would impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.
On June 27, 2018, Governor Brown signed California’s 2018-2019 budget. In this fact sheet, read a summary of budget items impacting older adults and people with disabilities.
On May 11, 2018, California Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. released the May Revision of the 2018-2019 budget. While it includes a significant increase in revenues and modest program investments for older adults and people with disabilities, the state still has no overarching master strategy to meet the needs of an aging California. Read more in this fact sheet.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reviews what's missing from Governor Brown's proposed 2018-2019 budget. It outlined modest adjustments to programs impacting older adults and people with disabilities and focuses on building the financial stability of the state, paying off debt, and strengthening elements of our infrastructure. It fails, however, to outline solutions to the challenges facing California’s older adults and people with disabilities.
On January 10, 2018, California Governor Brown released the proposed 2018-2019 budget. In this fact sheet, learn what modest program changes impacting older adults and people with disabilities were included, and where the budget falls short.
California maintained its rank at No. 9, but it must do more to keep up with the growth of the older adult population. This brief highlights trends in California’s performance and opportunities to improve its rate of progress.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses California's 2017-2018 proposed budget and how scaling back on key components of the Coordinated Care Initiative diminishes the state's progress toward integrated care for high-need, high-cost older adults.
The number of individuals age 65 and older across the nation is projected to double in the next 50 years, from over 45 million in 2015 to over 95 million in 2065. California's age 65 and older population stands at 4 million, which is projected to double to over 8 million by 2030. This brief offers a basic primer on long-term services and supports (LTSS) in California within a national context. LTSS, also known as long-term care (LTC), provides assistance to people with disabilities of all ages, including older adults who need help with daily activities.
Our annual summits create space for thought-leaders to learn and dialogue with each other about critical windows of opportunity, and how best to transform California's long-term services and supports ystem. Read Dr. Chernof's Perspectives on some key areas for system transformation that were discussed at the 2015 LTSS Summit.
The California Senate Select Committee on Aging and Long-Term Care released a report with recommendations on how California can transform its long-term care system. Read Dr. Bruce Chernof's latest Perspectives on three of the report's recommendations state lawmakers should focus on in the new legislative session.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses California's ranking in the 2014 Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) State Scorecard. The LTSS State Scorecard is published by AARP Policy Institute every three years, with support from The Commonwealth Fund and The SCAN Foundation.
This policy brief describes California’s results in the 2014 Long-Term Services and Supports State Scorecard, identifying areas for improvement as well as policy opportunities to transform and improve the state’s system of care.
In 2012, there was a dearth of information on how best to build partnerships between community-based organizations and health care systems. This brief, authored by Victor Tabbush, was developed to help readers better understand specific opportunities for these partnerships in California.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reflects on the Foundation's presence at the 2012 American Society on Aging Conference and how improving long-term care in California will require the long-term strategies and dedication of a social movement.