publication

ltss


    Tagged in: `ltss`

    Enacted on June 30, 2022, California’s 2022-23 budget addresses longstanding system challenges related to health care, long-term services and supports, workforce, and housing for older adults, people with disabilities, and their caregivers. It includes a $17 billion broad-based relief package and continued investment in implementing the Master Plan for Aging. 
    In this February 2022 Perspectives, Dr. Mohanty answers several questions regarding The SCAN Foundation’s aims and progress during during her first year of leadership.
    On January 10, 2022, Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2022-23 proposed budget. The proposal includes several program changes that impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.
    At the final week of our 2021 Forum, Amplifying All Voices in Aging, we were joined by founder of RENT Poet/Poet Laureate Brian Sonia-Wallace. Complementing our focus on technical aspects of the work we do to transform care for older adults, Mr. Sonia-Wallace authored a poem in real time to bring us back to the heart of the matter: What do we mean by “aging well” and “aging equitably”? Read the poem and learn more about RENT Poet.
    Enacted on July 12, 2021, California’s 2021-22 budget addresses longstanding system challenges related to health care, long-term services and supports, workforce, and housing for older adults, people with disabilities, and their caregivers. It reflects the recommendations of the governor’s Master Plan for Aging issued earlier in 2021, and includes $4.6 billion to enhance access to home- and community-based services (HCBS), as outlined in California’s proposed HCBS Spending Plan.
    On May 14, 2021, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2021-22 proposed budget. The revision includes a $75.7 billion surplus with investments in economic recovery related to COVID-19 and resources to implement the Master Plan for Aging.
    On January 8, 2021, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2021-22 proposed budget. The proposal includes program changes that impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.
    On January 6, 2021, California Governor Gavin Newsom released a Master Plan for Aging (Master Plan) that establishes a vision for California for All Ages by 2030. This policy brief provides an overview of the Master Plan.
    California ranked ninth overall on the 2020 LTSS State Scorecard, maintaining the same rank from 2017. This brief provides an overview of California’s Scorecard performance and key recommendations for transforming its LTSS system to better serve older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
    On June 29, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed California’s 2020-21 budget. The budget addresses the $54.3 billion deficit while maintaining funding for critical programs serving older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
    This policy brief takes a closer look at how California has implemented federal flexibilities to ensure the state’s long-term services and supports (LTSS) system is responsive to the needs of older adults and people with disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    In his latest Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses opportunities to drive change in care services and delivery that meet person-centered needs during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and beyond.
    On May 14, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2020-21 proposed budget. The revision includes cuts to and elimination of critical home- and community-based services that impact the state’s most vulnerable older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.

    Californians with Medicare and Medi-Cal have many choices to get the health coverage they need, but choices vary by county. This brief outlines available choices across the state and describes the My Care, My Choice web resource.

    The Blueprint for Health Plans (Executive Summary) highlights successful partnerships for delivering social services and helps identify future opportunities.
    The integration of community-based organizations (CBOs) into health plan networks, on both a formal and informal basis, can help meet the needs of older adults with complex medical and social needs. The Blueprint for Health Plans (Full Report) highlights successful partnerships for delivering social services and helps identify future opportunities.
    California maintained its rank at No. 9, but it must do more to keep up with the growth of the older adult population. This brief highlights trends in California’s performance and opportunities to improve its rate of progress.
    Immediately following the 2016 presidential election, Dr. Chernof wrote a letter to then President-elect Trump describing five action items for supporting older Americans.
    In this slide deck we discuss the case for financing older America’s long-term care need.
    The number of individuals age 65 and older across the nation is projected to double in the next 50 years, from over 45 million in 2015 to over 95 million in 2065. California's age 65 and older population stands at 4 million, which is projected to double to over 8 million by 2030. This brief offers a basic primer on long-term services and supports (LTSS) in California within a national context. LTSS, also known as long-term care (LTC), provides assistance to people with disabilities of all ages, including older adults who need help with daily activities.
    Last year, modeling efforts distilled various options to improve America’s financing system for long-term care. This month, three organizations – the Bipartisan Policy Center, LeadingAge, and the Long-Term Care Financing Collaborative – released related policy recommendations. This analysis identifies common themes and notes where the recommendations differ in perspective.
    Coordinated care makes a difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings, and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Karen's case study.
    Coordinated care makes a difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings, and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Zena's case study.
    Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities. Read Gabriela's case study.
    Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities. Read Josephine's case study.
    Coordinated Care Makes a Difference.  It prevents avoidable hospital re-admissions, transitions people out of institutional settings and helps people thrive in their communities.  Read Chito's case study.
    In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof explains what recent polling results and coordinated care stories tell us about the experiences of Medicare-Medicaid individuals, and identifies opportunities to further strengthen and expand support.
    This policy brief summarizes findings from long-term care financing option research by the Urban Institute and Milliman, Inc., courtesy of Health Affairs.
    California is among a dozen states participating in the national demonstration to improve care for people with serious chronic illnesses and functional limitations who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare. We commissioned the Field Research Corporation to poll the state's dual eligibles, including people enrolled and those opting out in five demonstration counties as well as people in non-demonstration counties. Find out more in this week's Perspectives.
    Read Dr. Bruce Chernof's Perspectives exploring progress on eight areas from the Affordable Care Act to help older Americans get the right care at the right time by the right providers.
    The California Senate Select Committee on Aging and Long-Term Care released a report with recommendations on how California can transform its long-term care system. Read Dr. Bruce Chernof's latest Perspectives on three of the report's recommendations state lawmakers should focus on in the new legislative session.
    In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses California's ranking in the 2014 Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) State Scorecard. The LTSS State Scorecard is published by AARP Policy Institute every three years, with support from The Commonwealth Fund and The SCAN Foundation.
    This policy brief describes California’s results in the 2014 Long-Term Services and Supports State Scorecard, identifying areas for improvement as well as policy opportunities to transform and improve the state’s system of care.
    Following on previous reports describing the population who uses Medi-Cal-funded long-term services and supports, the California Medicaid Research Institute has produced a report that describes key characteristics of the population using LTSS across each of the state’s 58 counties. This report describes spending and service use patterns across the 58 counties.
    This brief seeks to answer the question of how many employed individuals (who work for large companies, small companies, or are self-employed) do not currently have access to long-term care coverage. This brief also considers the characteristics that make different types of employers strong or weak prospects for long-term care planning options.
    This brief series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
    This brief series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
    Many older adults pay for long-term care out of their income and personal savings until they are poor enough to qualify for Medicaid. In an effort to avoid exhausting their resources and relying on Medicaid, others depend on unpaid family support or go without needed services. Learn more in this policy brief, developed with Avalere.
    This paper serves as an overview of the Shaping Affordable Pathways for Aging with Dignity series. The series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
    For people who have been independent all of their lives, transitioning to Medicaid means depending on a means-tested welfare program for their health and long-term care services. Moreover, people transitioning to Medicaid are a substantial portion of state Medicaid expenditures. In an effort to avoid exhausting their resources and relying on Medicaid, others depend on unpaid family support or go without needed services.