publication

Person-Centered Care

Health care and planning that is based on a person’s values and preferences


California ranked ninth overall on the 2020 LTSS State Scorecard, maintaining the same rank from 2017. This brief provides an overview of California’s Scorecard performance and key recommendations for transforming its LTSS system to better serve older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
In his latest Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses how voter interest and Master Plan for Aging action in other states can show us how to chart a meaningful path forward for aging in California.
This brief highlights states that have developed a Master Plan for Aging, examples of key elements, and how states without a Master Plan can get started.
On June 29, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed California’s 2020-21 budget. The budget addresses the $54.3 billion deficit while maintaining funding for critical programs serving older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
In his latest Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the factors that must be present for health systems in California to implement, scale, and sustain person-centered care models.  
For a provider group that treats individuals through a mix of risk arrangements, one might reasonably inquire: What is the tipping point when it becomes financially advantageous to offer person-centered care to the entirety of its high-need, high-cost population? This report by Victor Tabbush, based on research conducted with provider groups in California, seeks to answer this question and provide insights.
On May 14, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2020-21 proposed budget. The revision includes cuts to and elimination of critical home- and community-based services that impact the state’s most vulnerable older adults, people with disabilities, and family caregivers.
In his latest Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses how person-centered care is fundamental when confronting the challenges of coronavirus (COVID-19).
On January 10, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2020-21 proposed budget. The proposal includes program changes that specifically impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.
Californians with Medicare and Medi-Cal have many choices to get the health coverage they need, but choices vary by county. This brief outlines available choices across the state and describes the My Care, My Choice web resource.
On June 27, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed California’s 2019-20 budget. The budget reflects new program investments for older adults and people with disabilities, including staff resources for the state’s Master Plan for Aging.
On June 10, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N-14-19, calling for a California Master Plan for Aging. This brief provides a high-level overview of the Executive Order.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the Administration's plan to develop a California Master Plan for Aging (Master Plan). He frames four elements critical to the Master Plan’s success and asks all of us to reflect on what truly matters to older Californians and their families.
California Governor Newsom called for the development of a Master Plan for Aging, which marks a historic step. The governor stated this plan will serve as a blueprint to prepare California for future demographic changes. In this policy brief, we look at examples from other states and relevant California efforts.
The Master Plan for Aging provides a historic opportunity to design a system that best meets the needs of older Californians of today and tomorrow. This brief describes how the state can better organize resources to meet population needs through focused, coordinated leadership and system-wide planning.
On May 9, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom released the May Revision of the 2019-20 budget. The revision includes modest program changes that impact services for older adults and people with disabilities, including staff resources for the state’s Master Plan for Aging.
The Blueprint for Health Plans (Executive Summary) highlights successful partnerships for delivering social services and helps identify future opportunities.
The integration of community-based organizations (CBOs) into health plan networks, on both a formal and informal basis, can help meet the needs of older adults with complex medical and social needs. The Blueprint for Health Plans (Full Report) highlights successful partnerships for delivering social services and helps identify future opportunities.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reflects on the Master Plan for Aging panel discussion following the February 5 film screening of Lives Well Lived in Sacramento. At the event, local policymakers vocalized that without a strategy to meet the needs of all aging Californians, the state will confront mounting challenges.
On January 10, 2019, Governor Gavin Newsom released the 2019-20 proposed budget. Learn which modest program changes would impact services for older adults and people with disabilities.
Drawing from four years of Cal MediConnect evaluation results, this brief highlights recommendations for policymakers and health plans to consider in improving integrated systems of care for people with Medicare and Medicaid.
Today, health plans have flexible benefit tools in the Medicare Advantage program. With data analysis by Anne Tumlinson Innovations, this slide deck discusses how health plans can deploy these tools and adopt innovations to serve a rapidly growing group of members age 75 and older.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the Foundation's efforts over the past 10 years to better the lives of vulnerable older adults and families. He also reflects on the Foundation's priorities for 2019 and beyond.
In this open letter, Dr. Chernof commends Governor-elect Gavin Newsom on his commitment to develop "a master plan for aging with dignity" in California. Dr. Chernof lists key areas that a master plan must address, such as incorporating strategies for older adults to live and age in the place they call home and providing pathways for older Californians to access affordable health care.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses our eighth annual California Summit on Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS), which focused on strategies to strengthen advocacy and raise our collective voices. He also reflects on the two
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses The SCAN Foundation’s web-based tool to empower California’s dual eligibles with a better understanding of their care choices, based on both their location and the medical and supportive services
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the need for California’s lawmakers and next governor to develop a master plan for aging, accentuated by the results of a statewide survey revealing voter’s opinions on critical aging
On June 27, 2018, Governor Brown signed California’s 2018-2019 budget. In this fact sheet, read a summary of budget items impacting older adults and people with disabilities.
On May 11, 2018, California Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. released the May Revision of the 2018-2019 budget. While it includes a significant increase in revenues and modest program investments for older adults and people with disabilities, the state still has no overarching master strategy to meet the needs of an aging California. Read more in this fact sheet.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof reviews what's missing from Governor Brown's proposed 2018-2019 budget. It outlined modest adjustments to programs impacting older adults and people with disabilities and focuses on building the financial stability of the state, paying off debt, and strengthening elements of our infrastructure. It fails, however, to outline solutions to the challenges facing California’s older adults and people with disabilities.
On January 10, 2018, California Governor Brown released the proposed 2018-2019 budget. In this fact sheet, learn what modest program changes impacting older adults and people with disabilities were included, and where the budget falls short.
California maintained its rank at No. 9, but it must do more to keep up with the growth of the older adult population. This brief highlights trends in California’s performance and opportunities to improve its rate of progress.
The number of older Americans with complex care needs is projected to jump from 6 million to nearly 16 million in the next couple decades, creating different stresses on our health care system. In this
Immediately following the 2016 presidential election, Dr. Chernof wrote a letter to then President-elect Trump describing five action items for supporting older Americans.
In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof discusses the need to redefine current health care quality measures, especially from the vantage point of those needing care and not just for those who provide and pay for it. In support of this goal, three new resources are available to help frame measures and advance this work.
Since inception six years ago, enrollment for The SCAN Foundation’s California Summit on Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) has doubled. The LTSS Summit provides a rare opportunity for service providers, aging and disability advocates, health
This policy brief provides an overview of the various types of quality measures and how they are created, why quality measures matter when caring for adults with complex care needs in integrated systems, and how stakeholders can influence the quality measure development process.
Adults with complex care needs are currently often served by a number of providers and systems that do not talk to each other or coordinate efforts, making it difficult for individuals to receive high-quality care. Efforts to transform delivery systems and associated quality measurements for this vulnerable population are also fragmented. The SCAN Foundation convened a working group to develop consensus on the Essential Attributes of a high-quality system of care that supports system transformation and evaluation. This full report includes the abbreviated literature review of existing frameworks.
This primer document describes the Essential Attributes of this system and the core elements detailing how delivery systems should function to meet the goal, and key definitions of concepts. Collectively, they represent the milestones that, when regularly monitored and measured, can track progress toward the goal.
As Medicare moves away from fee-for-service and utilization-based managed care to value-based purchasing, addressing older adults’ health in light of functional needs is becoming a business necessity. In this Perspectives, Dr. Chernof recognizes delivery systems that champion person-centered care as the practical way of the future and introduces two resources to help health systems leaders justify and ramp up greater adoption of person-centered care models.