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medicaid


Tagged in: `medicaid`

Immediately following the 2016 presidential election, Dr. Chernof wrote a letter to then President-elect Trump describing five action items for supporting older Americans.
Read Dr. Chernof's perspectives on the importance of there being effective partnerships between health care entities and community-based organizations.
Following on previous reports describing the population who uses Medi-Cal-funded long-term services and supports, the California Medicaid Research Institute has produced a report that describes key characteristics of the population using LTSS across each of the state’s 58 counties. This report describes spending and service use patterns across the 58 counties.
This brief series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
This brief series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
Many older adults pay for long-term care out of their income and personal savings until they are poor enough to qualify for Medicaid. In an effort to avoid exhausting their resources and relying on Medicaid, others depend on unpaid family support or go without needed services. Learn more in this policy brief, developed with Avalere.
This paper serves as an overview of the Shaping Affordable Pathways for Aging with Dignity series. The series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
For people who have been independent all of their lives, transitioning to Medicaid means depending on a means-tested welfare program for their health and long-term care services. Moreover, people transitioning to Medicaid are a substantial portion of state Medicaid expenditures. In an effort to avoid exhausting their resources and relying on Medicaid, others depend on unpaid family support or go without needed services.
The long-term care financing series summarizes current issues in financing long-term care and outlines policy options for increasing affordable access to services.
In this paper, the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) discusses prior integration efforts; introduces a model for integrated entities and a framework for assessing and promoting quality of integrated care; and explores the challenges to implementing and achieving the goals of person-centered, integrated care for Medicare-Medicaid beneficiaries. They use the word “framework” to describe the key concepts underlying the structure and process measures; it can also be expanded to include the content of performance measures as companions to the structure and process measures.